Activity at Klyuchevskoy Volcano

This photograph highlights one of the most active volcanic regions on Earth: the Kamchatka Peninsula in far eastern Russia.  The three largest volcanoes visible at the center include Kliuchevskoy, Bezymianny, and Ushkovsky.  A thin ash and steam plume extends to the east-southeast from the summit of Kliuchevskoy, typical of activity reported at the volcano from early May of this year, when this image was taken from the International Space Station.  For more on this image and location, see http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/Collections/EarthObservatory/articles/KlyuchevskoyVolcano.htm.

Lunar and Planetary Science Conference 2015 (#LPSC2015)

Each year, the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) brings together international specialists in petrology, geochemistry, geophysics, geology, and astronomy to present the latest results of research in planetary science. #LPSC2015 was held in The Woodlands, TX from March 16 – 20th.  The conference, organized by topical symposia and problem-oriented sessions, was a fabulous success!  Among the presenters, #NASA_ARES staff, including #Jacobs_Science team members were lead authors on 50+ abstracts.

IMG_0876Here is an alphabetized list of our NASA_ARES led oral and poster presenters (with many #NASA_ARES co-authors) with links to their abstracts for additional information:

Oral Presentations:

   Duck  Justin AnnePoster Presentations:

Celebrating the Apollo 11 Mission and the First Lunar Samples Returned to Earth

Apollo 11 launch, landing, rock collection, and sample delivery to the Lunar Receiving Laboratory. Picture of lunar rock shown on bottom right.

Apollo 11 launch, landing, rock collection, and sample delivery to the Lunar Receiving Laboratory. Picture of lunar rock shown on bottom right.

Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to walk on the surface of the Moon, uttered a statement heard around the world in July 1969…“That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” Apollo 11 launched on July 16, landed on the Moon on July 20th, and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. This extraordinary mission, 45 years ago, was also the first time astronauts collected and brought back samples from the lunar surface. These precious Apollo 11 samples, and others collected during other Apollo missions to the Moon, continue to help scientists investigate and better understand the history of the Moon. All collected lunar rocks and soils are housed in the specialized lunar curational facilitates maintained by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) staff at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.